Korean Pop Culture is to American Pop Culture…

…as Christian Rock is to Secular Rock.

So, with no other thoughts for the day I leave you with the music video that inspired this post.

Advertisements

7 Comments

Filed under Culture, Korean MTV, Links and Random Thoughts, Videos

7 responses to “Korean Pop Culture is to American Pop Culture…

  1. anonymous

    Hello !!

    What do you think off Lee Hyori ??

  2. Question

    What do you think off Lee Hyori ??

    i know she’s a huge star in South Korea ..

  3. Harsh analysis. Funny, bang-on, but harsh. Both even deal in parallels – my friend’s father ran a Christian books/music store, and he once gave me a chart of “If you like U2, you might like …” “If you like Mariah Carey, you might like. . .” similar artists. I’ve heard Korean popstars described likewise — “The Korean Bob Dylan.” “The Korean Britney Spears” “The Korean (insert random sucky American ballad singer)”

    If you want to get really depressed, listen to Korean Christian music. Where does IT fit into your paradigm?

  4. answer: About Lee Hyori. It’s funny you should mention her as I recently spent a significant chunk of my afternoon looking up videos of her. She definitely is huge here in Korea, and I can see why. She’s absolutely gorgeous.

    She has one of the anyplay cell phone contracts, which is reserved for only the biggest Korean musicians.

    As far as music is concerned though? Outside of her remarkable beauty I find her music completely unremarkable, even for pop music. This is coming from somebody who admits to having an obsession with terrible pop music and spends his days and nights learning the Korean lyrics to “Big Bang” songs. It seems that the more popular a singer is in Korea that more middle of the road their music is…but that makes sense, because once you reach a certain level in Korean entertainment you are no longer an artist, but rather a commercial spokesperson.

    Roboseyo:
    The thing I like about Korean pop music is that it isn’t trying to lie about their artistic credibility. They know they’re Asianized versions of American pop stars and they seem completely comfortable with it.

    As far as Christian music goes, your talking to someone who grew up thinking that DC Talks “Jesus Freak” album was the greatest thing since sliced pickles. To this day I still enjoy the occasional “Jars of Clay” or “Newsboys” and if I was completely honest would probably list a gospel accapella tape as the most influential album of his life (outside of “Illmatic” by Nas, of course).

    Despite my criticisms I like Korean pop, the same way I like some contemporary Christian. So, even though K-pop may be a watered down version of American pop…really, who cares?

    When it comes to pop music so many people try to criticize different artists for seeming to lack talent. But differentiating between pop artists is like differentiating between a vacuum and a washed up porn star…they both suck. It really comes down to “do you like the song,” which is a question I think lots of people forget.

    As for Korean Christian Pop…well, I think it sounds just like American Christian Pop.

  5. Question

    Yep ..i agree !!!

    Her smile is just so sweet/charming !!!!!!

  6. Question

    Here’s few of her pics i found ,if you don’t mind ??

  7. “As far as Christian music goes, your talking to someone who grew up thinking that DC Talks “Jesus Freak” album was the greatest thing since sliced pickles. . . .”

    Oh, I had every word to “Jesus Freak” memorized, and knew all the raps to “Free at Last,” too. Before about 1998, when groups like MXPX came along and Sixpence None the Richer had a radio hit, I once noticed that it was pretty easy to tell when someone started listening to Christian rock by finding out the first album to which they knew all the words.

    It went:
    Cutting Edge by Delirious
    Jars Of Clay
    Jesus Freak – DC Talk
    Going Public – Newsboys
    Free At Last – DC Talk
    Heart in Motion (Amy Grant)
    Change Your World (Michael W. Smith)

    That was my generation, anyway. The parallel charts were funny to me, and then there was the never-ending “U2: Christian or evil?” debate at my Christian university. My personal favorite was always Rich Mullins, though.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s